Ban on smoking and driving raised again

Interesting to see the , [disclosure its spokesperson, Simon Ettinghausen is a member] has launched a public relations campaign for a ban on smoking whilst driving.

This is a topic that I blogged about in January – and I note that the epetition on the topic at the 10 Downing Street website has only attracted 300 more signatures in the past 4 months. 

Vehicles used for business purposes will be affected by the change in the law in England in July – and already companies such as BT are enforcing a ban on smoking in company cars on the grounds of dangers of passive smoking for any passengers on company business.

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Heather Yaxley

Heather Yaxley is passionate about PR - teaching the CIPR qualifications, lecturing part-time at Bournemouth University and running the Motor Industry Public Affairs Association (MIPAA). I'm undertaking a PhD looking at Career Strategies in PR. I love sharing ideas and knowledge - connecting news and views by blogging on public relations and educational developments, especially relating to accelerated and active learning. I'm also a published author, qualified trainer and experienced consultant.

11 thoughts on “Ban on smoking and driving raised again”

  1. If you can smell it,it’s killing you and it takes a hurricane to ventilate it.
    If you work in a smoky bar you’re breathing 15 cigarettes a day.
    Secondhand smoke is more deadly than smoking.
    Deadly toxins remain long after a room or car has been smoked in.etc etc.

    There is apparently no limit to the straight faced absurdities that health nazis will regurgitate in their mission of smoker harassment. One can only hope they’ll soon lose all credibility.

  2. If you can smell it,it’s killing you and it takes a hurricane to ventilate it.
    If you work in a smoky bar you’re breathing 15 cigarettes a day.
    Secondhand smoke is more deadly than smoking.
    Deadly toxins remain long after a room or car has been smoked in.etc etc.

    There is apparently no limit to the straight faced absurdities that health nazis will regurgitate in their mission of smoker harassment. One can only hope they’ll soon lose all credibility.

  3. I do get annoyed by the fact that it isn’t illegal to smoke and governments aren’t likely to make it so,but they are happy to introduce various bans. It seems to be the zeitgeist though – with ridiculous figures and points often made to support the “ban it” viewpoint.

    Having said that I was in a pub in Cardiff yesterday where they’ve had a ban for a few months and it was much more pleasant than last time I was there before Christmas.

    I think that the “success” in banning smoking in bars will lead to more and more demands in the “interest” of health and safety. And smoking won’t be the last behaviour affected. Drinking alcohol, driving, and other activities are clearly in the targets of those who feel they know best.

  4. We’re used to the ban up here in Scotland and it makes for a far better night out at a restaurant or pub when you don’t go home stinking. Off to Dublin the weekend after next which of course has been smoke free in public for even longer. We have been several times since and while I can’t judge whether their pubs are doing less business or not being a non-smoker it makes for no less of a fun night out in the Barmuda Triangle.

  5. The pub in Cardiff appeared to be busy – but we had an interesting chat with the main smoker in our group who said nightclubs are now dreadful because instead of smoke, they smell of unpleasant human odours. I’m sure a lot of sweaty people dancing does create a distinctive atmosphere – but as yet, there are no claims of an impact on the passive smellies.

  6. Yet another Yaxley post with a running scent theme. Perhaps the sweaty, smelly dancers should be imprisoned in cages, a la your pickle people.

    https://greenbanana.wordpress.com/2007/04/07/do-girls-really-need-polly-wheels/

    FYI, the (Ontario) Ministry of Health Promotion instituted a cross-provincial “smoke-free restaurants and bars campaign” last fall. In some cases business is up, with non-smokers returning to night clubs, etc., after years of staying away. On the other hand, the (very-few-and-far-between) outdoor patios that do allow smoking are extremely popular.

    I know a few of the civil servants who worked on the program, particularly in developing the public education and media-launch aspects. They worked very long hours (late into the night), but the measurement analysis post-launch indicated that the majority of (extensive) media coverage was quite positive.

    I think banning smoking in cars is also under consideration, but unlikely to happen. Instead, I suspect efforts will be directed towards increased public education about the ill-effects of second-hand smoke on children within the confines of cars.

  7. Judy – actually one of my favourite novels of all time is Perfume by Patrick Suskind, but I wasn’t aware that I have a odour/scent fixation…

    I do think that anti-smoking is at a tipping point – the messages have got home about it being harmful and many wannabe quitters seem content to have the government make things difficult for them rather than address the issue themselves.

    I’m not totally comfortable with the way groups against smoking have gone about their mission – and the use of children is very questionable. But being a never-smoker, then I don’t have a big issue with the consequences.

    I just hope that the anti-groups of something I do enjoy – driving, drinking (not at the same time), travelling, etc – don’t think banning is their answer too.

  8. I wonder how used car dealers cope with left over cigarette smell clinging onto the furnishings? I was looking at a used car the other day, the leather upholstery had a big body stain on it and the carpet was filty. I think valeting should be done at the point of the car being collected in and again at point of sale.

    Said car was on the forecourt for four months before it moved. Price maybe a reason but not the only one….

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